Item:Q5994

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Degrassi, A., "L'iscrizione in onore di Aezio e l'atrium Libertatis", Bullettino della Commissione Archeologica COmunale di Roma, 72 , 1946-1948 , pp. 33-44 [edit]

Lower portion of base for statue of Aetius, master of the soldiery and consul, probably of gilded bronze; statue commanded by the emperors. Rome. 437-445. [edit]

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Statements

University of Oxford
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To ...and not just master of the army in Gaul which he returned a short while ago to Roman rule through victories sworn in war and peace, master of both armies and consul for a second time and patrician, forever dear to the Commonwealth ( res publica ) and decorated with all military gifts. For him, on account of the security of Italy which he was oustanding in winning with the distant peoples, the Burgundians and Goths, subdued, conquered, and oppressed. By order of the princes, our lords Theodosius and Placidus Valentinian, forever Augusti. In the atrium of Peace, which its kinfolk erects, extends, and cares for by nature, the Senate and Roman People justly sets up a [gold?] statue for him upright in morals, receding from wealth, most despised by informers and enemies, vindicator of freedom, avenger of honour…
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