Item:Q9689

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AE 1999, 0031 [edit]

Decree of the senate and law concerning honours for the dead Germanicus Caesar [edit]

Also known as:
  • Tabula Siarensis
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Statements

HD002024
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[--- for the purpose of preserving the memory of Germanicus Caes]ar who ought never to die away, [the senate has decided that a decree of the senate shall be passed concerning the honors] owed to Germanicus Caesar [---, and therefore it has pleased (the senate) that there shall be a discussion about] this matter together with the advice of Tiberius Caesar Augustus, [our] Leader, [and that a document] shall be prepared for him with the total amount of (senatorial) opinions (about such honors), and that he (the emperor), with his customary [indulgence,] shall select [from all the] honors, which the senate decided should be granted [those which Tiberius Caesar Augustus and] Augusta his mother and Drusus Caesar and the mother of Germanicus Ca[esar and Agrippina his wife,] invited by them also (to take part) in the deliberation, will have judged appropriate enough to be granted (to Germanicus). [Concerning this matter it has been decided as follows:] It has pleased (the senate) that a marble archway shall be constructed in the Circus Flaminius at [public expense, set up] in the place where statues [have already been dedicated] to the deified Augustus and to the Augustan House by Gaius Norbanus Flaccus, together with gilded reliefs of the defeated nations [and with an inscription] on the front of the archway (stating) that the senate and Roman People had dedicated this [marble] monument to the memory of Germanicus Caesar after he had defeated the Germans in war [and then] had cleared them out of Gaul, recovered our military standards, avendged the perfidious [defeat] of the army of the Roman People, established the status of the Gauls, and has been sent as proconsul to the overseas provinces [of Asia]to give shape to them and to the kingdoms of the same area in accordance with the orders of Tiberius Caesar Au[gustus, and had placed] a king on [the throne of] Armenia, not sparing his labour until by decree of the senate [an ovation was granted to him] and he had died for the sake of the Rebublic; (it has also pleased the senate) that above this archway a statue of Ger[manicus Caesar] shall be erected, (with him) in a triumphal chariot and at his sides shall be statues of D[rusus Germanicus his father,] the natural brother of Tiberius Caesar Augustus, and of Antonia his mother, [and of Agrippina his wife, and of Li]via his sister, and of Tiberius Germanicus his brother, and of his sons and daughters. (It has also pleased the senate that) a second archway shall be constructed in the grove of mount Amanus which is in [the province of Syria, or in any other place which may seem] more suitable to Tiberius Caesar Augustus, our Leader, [in the regions which had come under] the care and protection of Germanicus Caesar in accordance with the authority of [Tiberius Caesar Augustus;] likewise, his statue shall be erected (there) and an inscription engraved on it that is consistent [with the accomplishments of Germanicus Caesar;] a third archway or [monument shall be constructed at the banks of the Rhine round about the tomb] which [the army of the Roman people had speedily raised up] for Drusus the brother of Tiberius Caesar Augustus, [our Leader,] and then later had been finished with the permission of the deified Augustus, [and, likewise, a honorary tomb of Germanicus Cae]sar shall be raised up (which will show him) receiving [supplications from Germans and especially from the Gaul]s and the Germans who [live] on this side of the Rhine [and whose states had been ordered by the deified] Augustus to [perform] a divine ceremony at the tomb [of Drusus, and likewise they shall give to his memory a solemn and ritual sacrifice], performing the rites at his tomb [each year on the day when Germanicus Caesar passed away;] and since there was in the region (...) of Germanicus Caesar (...). Likewise, it has pleased the senate that a [marble sepulchre shall be erected to the memory of Germanicus Caesar at Antioch] in the forum [where the body of Germanicus Caesar had been cremated (...),] and that [at Epidaphna, where Germanicus Caesar had breathed his last, a platform shall be constructed (...),] (...). [(...) (And it has pleased the senate) that on the sixth day before the Ides of October (October 10) each year in front of the altar] which is [in front of the tomb of Germanicus Caesar,] ceremonies to his spirit shall be performed [publicly to his memory by the masters of the sodales] Augustales clothed in the [dark] togas of mourning, whose [legal and divine right it is to wear] the toga of that color on that day, with the same ritual of sacrifice as [is performed publicly in the ceremonies] to the spirits of Gaius and Lucius Caesar; and that a bronze tombstone next to the [tomb of Germanicus Caesar] likewise shall be engraved, so that these decrees of the senate may be inscribed on it which [pertain to his honours,] and that on that day no permission to conduct publicly any serious business [shall be given to the magistrates in charge of the administration of justice in a] municipality or a colony of Roman or Latin citizens, [and that on that day no public banquets hereafter] or weddings of Roman citizens or betrothals shall take place, [and that nobody] shall take [from anyone money that is owed (to him)] or shall give it to anyone, and that no public games shall be presented or [looked at, and that nothing at all connected with the games] shall be done. And (it has pleased the senate) that the Scenic Games of Augustus [which] customarily [take place on the fourth day before the Ides of October (October 12) in memory of the deified Augus]tus, shall be presented on the fifth day before the Kalends of November (October 28) with a [postponement of two nundinae, beginning with] that day on which Germanicus Caesar died, [in order that his funerary ceremonies may not be marred] by a day of scenic games. [(...) Tiberius Caesar Augustus, our] Leader, (...) day (...) and an address (...) to approve (...) urban tribes and (...) promised; therefore it has pleased [the senate that the urban plebs shall erect at public expense statues of Germa]nicus Caesar with triumphal cloak [in those temples and in] those pulic places in which the deified Augus[tus and Augusta] had erected (statues) [for Drusus Germanicus, his ( i.e. Germanicus Caesar’s) father,] together with an inscription of the urban plebs’ [thirty-five tribes; and that likewise] the verse, which Tiberius Caesar Augustus set forth before this (senatorial) order on the 17th day before the Kalends of January (December 16) [to praise the dead Germanicus,] shall be engraved on bronze and set up in whatever public place might please [his father;] and the senate thought it would be even more just, because the most intimate [document of Tiberius] Caesar Augustus and of Germanicus Caesar, his son, contained not so much a praise as a methodical ordering of his whole life and a true testimony of his excellence, that it should be passed on to eternal memory, and (because) he himself had testified in that same document that he did not wish to dissimulate and (because) he had judged that it would be useful for the youth of our children and descendants.Likewise, in order that the piety of Drusus Caesar might be even better attested, it has pleased (the senate), that the document which he had read aloud at the last meeting of the senate shall be inscribed on bronze and fixed in poisition in whatever place might be pleasing to his father and himself. And, likewise (it has pleased the senate) that this decree of the senate shall be inscribed on bronze together with that decree of the senate which was passed on the 17th day before the Kalends of January (December 16), and that the bronze (tablet) shall be fixed in position on the Palatine in the portico which is next to the temple of Apollo, where the senate held its meeting. Likewise, the senate wished and decided it was just, in order that the piety of all the orders toward the Augustan House and the consent of all citizens for honoring Germanicus Caesar might appear more easily, that the consuls shall publish this decree of the senate with an edict of their own and shall order the magistrates and legates of municipalities and colonies to send out a copy of it to the municipalities and colonies of Italy and to those colonie which are in the provinces, and that also those men who are in charge in the provinces would act rightly and in proper form if they would see to it that this decree of the senate is fixed in position in the most frequented place. And (it has pleased the senate) that Marcus Messalla (and) Marcus Aurelius Cotta Maximus, consuls designate (for AD 20), as soon as they enter the magistracy and when by the auspices it is permitted them, without delay of two or three nundinae, shall see to the passage of a law before the People about honors for Germanicus Caesar. Decreed. In the senate 285 (senators) were present. This decree of the senate, by a second session, was made into one (with the decree of December 16). (...) And (it has pleased the senate) that on the Palatine [in the portico by the temple of Apollo, in which the senate] is accustomed to meet, [amid the images of men of illustrious character shall be placed those of Germanicus Caesar] and Drusus Ger[manicus, his natural father and brother of Tiberius Caesar Augustus,] who was also himself (i.e. Drusus Germanicus) [of creative ability, (the images to be placed) on the capitals] of the columns [of that pediment by which the statue of Apollo is protected.] And (it has pleased the senate) that the Salii [shall place] in their hymns [the name of Germanicus Caesar to honor] his memory [which honor was also granted to Gaius and Lucius Caesar, brothers of Tiberius] Caesar Augu[stus, and that to the ten centuries of the Caesars, which are accustomed to cast their vote for the destinatio] of consuls and praetors, [there shall be added five centuries.]
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(…) to preserve the memory of Germanicus Caesar who should never have died, the Senate decided that a decree of the Senate (senatus consultum) should be made concerning the honours deserved by Germanicus Caesar (…) and so it appeared good to proceed in this affair with the counsel of Tiberius Caesar Augustus, our emperor (princeps), and that a written memorandum (libellus), with a record of the senators’ opinions, be made for him, and that he, with his usual clemency, would select, from all the honours which the Senate felt [Germanicus] should have, those which Tiberius Caesar Augustus himself, and Augusta his mother, and Drusus Caesar, and the mother of Germanicus Caesar, and Agrippina his wife, who was also called into the decision, would think appropriate to be held [by Germanicus]. They decided in this matter as follows: it was agreed that a marble arch (ianus) be built from public funds and be placed in the circus Flaminius, in the place where statues to the deified Augustus and the imperial family were already dedicated by Caius Norbanus Flaccus; with gilded images (signis) of the defeated peoples, and an inscription on the front of this arch [stating] that the Roman Senate and People dedicated this marble monument to the memory of Germanicus Caesar, because he, having defeated the Germans in war and then removed them from Gaul, and having recovered the military standards and avenged the treacherous defeat of the army of the Roman people, and having ordered the state of the Gallic provinces, was sent as proconsul to the overseas provinces of Asia, to re-order them and the kingdoms of this region. When he had appointed a king of Armenia on the orders of Tiberius Caesar Augustus, he did not spare his labours, and before a triumphal entry into Rome [an ovatio, the lesser form of a triumph, which was still possible for non-emperors] could be conceded to him by decree of the Senate, he met his death for the state. On top of this arch a statue of Germanicus Caesar in a triumphal chariot should be set, and on to his side statues of his father Drusus Germanicus, the natural brother of Tiberius Caesar Augustus, and of his mother Antonia, and of his wife Agrippina, and of his sister Livia, and of his brother Tiberius Germanicus [= the later emperor Claudius], and of his sons and daughters. A second arch should be set up in the grove of mount Amanus, which is in the province of Syria, or wherever, if another location seemed more appropriate to our emperor Tiberius Caesar Augustus in the regions which had come under the care and protection of Germanicus Caesar by authority of Tiberius Caesar Augustus; [here] too his statue should be set up, and an inscription should be carved, suitable for the great deeds of Germanicus Caesar. A third arch or monument should be on the bank of the Rhine, close to the tumulus which the army of the Roman people had swiftly begun for Drusus, the brother of Tiberius Caesar Augustus, our emperor, and then completed with permission of the deified Augustus. Likewise an honorary grave (honorarius tumulus) of Germanicus Caesar should be erected, which should receive offerings from the Germanic peoples, and particularly from the Gallic and Germanic peoples who live on this side of the Rhine [the Roman side, the west bank of the river], whose communities (civitates) had been ordered by the deified Augustus to perform religious rites (rem divinam) at the grave of Drusus; and they should offer to his (Germanicus’) memory a sacrifice, solemn and according to ritual, and they should offer this each year on the day on which Germanicus Caesar died. And because there is a theatre in the region where the grave of his father Drusus is, a solemn play on the birthday of Germanicus Caesar was instituted there by this decree of the Senate. Furthermore it was agreed that a marble cenotaph (sepulcrum) should be built to the memory of Germanicus Caesar on the forum of Antioch, where the body of Germanicus Caesar was cremated, (...) and that at Epidaphne, where Germanicus Caesar breathed his last, a catafalque (tribunal) should be set up. Each year on the sixth day before the Ides of October [= 10th October], at the altar which stands in front of the grave of Germanicus Caesar, in his memory offerings (inferiae) should be placed publicly to his dead spirits (Manibus) through the masters (magistri) of the sodales Augustales [= a college of priests for the veneration of a dead emperor], clad in dark togas - those of them who have the secular and religious right to wear a toga of their own colour on that day – according to the same rite of sacrifice used for the offerings to the dead spirits of Caius and Lucius Caesar. And a bronze altar at this grave of Germanicus Caesar shall be similarly inscribed, so that these decrees of the Senate which concern his honours will be carved on it. And the office holders who administer justice in a municipality or colony of Roman or Latin citizens shall not be allowed to negotiate publicly anything serious on this day; and henceforth no public banquet must be held on this day, nor any wedding of Roman citizens, nor any betrothal; and nobody should claim back lent money from anybody, nor give any out; and no games must take place or be watched, nor anything related to the games; and the Augustan theatrical games (ludi Augustales scaenici) which used to be held on the fourth day before the Ides of October [= 12th October] in memory of the deified Augustus shall be delayed to the fifth day before the Calends of November [= 28th October]; by this delay of two nundini [= a unit of eight days, similar to our week] after the day on which Germanicus Caesar died, the day of the theatrical games will not be saddened by these funerary rites. (...) to Tiberius Caesar Augustus, our emperor (...) that the day also (...) and his speech (...) and to show his (...) and the electoral units of the city (tribus urbanae) shall be (...) and (...) were vowed; and so it appeared good to the Senate that the people of the city (plebs urbana) would publicly set up statues of Germanicus Caesar in triumphal garb, in those temples and in those public spaces which the deified Augustus and Augusta had laid out for his father Drusus Germanicus, with an inscription of the 35 electoral units (tribus) of the city’s people.Likewise, that the poem (carmen), which Tiberius Caesar Augustus had delivered to the Senate ((?) in eo ordine) on the seventeenth day before the Calends of January (= 16th December) praising the dead Germanicus, should be inscribed in bronze and set up in a public space, wherever it appeared good to his father. And the Senate thought that this would be all the more just, because the personal writing (libellus) of Tiberius Caesar Augustus contained not so much a eulogy of his son Germanicus Caesar, as the account of his whole life and a true testimony of his virtue; and because he himself had attested in the same writing that it was no secret that he wishes it to be delivered to eternal memory, and judges that it will be useful for the young, our children and descendants. Furthermore, in order that the piety of Drusus Caesar would become so much the better known, it was agreed that the memorial (libellus) which he read out in the most recent session of the Senate (proxumo senatu) should be inscribed in bronze and be set up in a place which would suit his father and himself. Likewise that this decree of the Senate should be inscribed in bronze, together with the decree of the Senate which was given on the 17th day before the Calends of January (= 16th December), and that this bronze [plaque] should be set up on the Palatine hill, in the portico which adjoins the temple of Apollo, where the Senate meets. Likewise that the Senate wishes, and thinks it just, that, in order that the devotion of all classes (ordines) towards the imperial family (domus Augusta), and the agreement of all citizens to honour the memory of Germanicus Caesar, be made more easily visible, that the consuls publish this decree of the Senate together with their own edict, and that they order, that the office holders and the ambassadors of the municipalities and colonies must send a written copy to the municipalities and colonies of Italy, and to the Roman colonies in the provinces, and that those who command the provinces [i.e. the provincial governors] would act rightly and according to order, if they took the trouble to ensure that this decree of the Senate be fixed in the most frequented place possible. And that Marcus Messala and Marcus Aurelius Cotta Maximus, the consuls designate [i.e. for the following year, AD 20], as soon as they enter office, on the first occasion that the auspices allow, and without the delay of two or three nundinae [this period was usually demanded by the lex Didia Caecilia between the publication of a law and its vote in the assembly], should see that the law regarding the honours of Germanicus Caesar be made public to the people (populus). So they decided. 285 [senators] were present in the Senate. This decree of the Senate, made through a second communication, is one [(?) with the decree from 16 December]. (...) of this temple, that (...) of Germanicus Caesar be executed, which (...) of the temples of the deified Augustus (...) games of the Victory of Caesar (...) of Augustus (...) of Tiberius Caesar Augustus (...) in the temple of Concordia (...) these equestrian statues of Germanicus Caesar which are (...) shall be offered (...) shall take care that (...) for this reason in public (...) and that on the Palatine hill, in the portico of Apollo, in the temple in which the Senate usually sits, portraits (imagines) of Germanicus Caesar and of Drusus Germanicus, his father and the natural brother of Tiberius Caesar Augustus, who was himself of remarkable character, should be set up among the portraits of men of outstanding character, above the capitals of the columns of the canopy (fastigium) which covers the cult statue (simulacrum) of Apollo.And that the Salii [= a priestly college] in their songs should, in his honour and memory, include the name of Germanicus Caesar, an honour which was [also] bestowed on Caius and on Lucius Caesar, the brothers of Tiberius Caesar Augustus; and that to the ten centuriae [= voting units] of Caius and Lucius Caesar, which are used to make the decision about the consuls and praetors to be appointed, should be added (...).
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(...) um die Erinnerung an Germanicus Caesar, der niemals hätte sterben dürfen, zu bewahren, beschloss der Senat, dass ein Senatsbeschluss ergehen müsse über die Ehrungen, die Germanicus Caesar verdiente. (...) und so gefiel es, dass in dieser Sache nach dem Rat des Tiberius Caesar Augustus, unseres Herrn, verfahren werden sollte, und dass ein Memorandum (libellus) mit den Meinungsäußerungen im Senat für ihn zusammengestellt würde, und dass er mit der ihm eigenen Milde aus all den Ehren, die (dem Germanicus) nach Ansicht des Senats zustanden, diejenigen aussuchen sollte, die Tiberius Caesar Augustus und Augusta, seine Mutter, und Drusus Caesar und die Mutter des Germanicus Caesar und Agrippina, seine Frau, die von ihnen zur Beratung hinzugezogen wurde, für angemessen halten würden.In dieser Sache wurde folgendermaßen entschieden: es gefiel (dem Senat), dass aus öffentlichen Geldern ein marmorner Bogen gebaut würde, und im Circus Flaminius bei dem Ort aufgestellt würde, an dem schon Statuen für den Divus Augustus und das kaiserliche Haus von Caius Norbanus Flaccus geweiht wurden, mit vergoldeten Bildern der besiegten Völker und mit einer Inschrift auf der Vorderseite dieses Bogens (,die besagen soll), dass der Senat und das römische Volk dieses marmorne Denkmal dem Andenken and Germanicus Caesar geweiht hätten; denn er (is statt iis?) sei, nachdem er die Germanen im Krieg besiegt und dann aus Gallien vertrieben hatte, und nachdem er die militärischen Standarten wiedergewonnenen, und damit die heimtückische Niederlage des Heeres des römischen Volkes gerächt hatte, und nachdem er die Angelegenheiten der gallischen (Provinzen) in Ordung gebracht hatte, als Proconsul in die transmarinen Provinzen Asiens gesandt worden, um sie und die Königreiche dieses Erdteils in Übereinstimmung zu bringen; nachdem er, gemäß den Anweisungen des Tiberius Caesar Augustus, einen König Armeniens eingesetzt hatte, schonte er sich nicht in seinen Mühen; jedoch bevor ihm auf Beschluss des Senates ein kleiner Triumph (ovatio) bewilligt worden sei, sei er den Tod für das Vaterland gestorben. Und auf diesen Bogen sollte eine Statue des Germanicus Caesar gestellt werden, in einem TTriuTriumphwagen, und zu seinen Seiten Statuen des Drusus Germanicus, seines Vaters, des natürlichen Bruders des Tiberius Caesar Augustus, und seiner Mutter Antonia, und seiner Gattin Agrippina, und seiner Schwester Livia, und seines Bruders Tiberius Germanicus (der spätere Kaiser Claudius), und seiner Söhne und Töchter.Ein weiterer Bogen soll erichtet werden im Hain des Berges Amanus, der sich in der Provinz Syria befindet, oder an einem beliebigen Ort, wenn ein anderer Ort dem Tiberius Caesar Augustus, unserem Herrn, angemessener erscheint, in den Gegenden, die durch die Autorität des Tiberius Caesar Augustus unter die Fürsoge und den Schutz des Germanicus Caesar gekommen waren. Hier soll ebenfalls seine Statue aufgestellt werden, und eine Inschrift, die den großen Taten des Germanicus Caesar gerecht werde, soll eingemeißelt werden. Ein dritter Bogen soll als Denkmal am Ufer des Rheins errichtet werden, bei dem Tumulus, den das Heer des römischen Volkes dem Drusus, dem Bruder des Tiberius Caesar Augustus, unseres Kaisers, rasch (nach dessen Tod) zu errichten begonnen und dann mit Erlaubnis des vergöttlichten Augustus vollendet hat; gleichermaßen soll ein Ehrengrab (honorarius tumulus) des Germanicus Caesar errichtet werden, wo er die kultischen Verehrungen von den Germanen empfängt, und insbesondere von denjenigen Galliern und Germanen, die diesseits des Rheines wohnen und deren Gemeinden (civitates) von dem vergöttlichten Augustus den Befehl empfangen hatten, am Tumulus des Drusus kultische Ehren darzubringen; diese sollten zu seinem Gedenken feierlich und dem religiösen Brauch entsprechend ein Totenopfer darbringen, jährlich an dem Tag, an dem Germanicus Caesar gestorben ist. Und weil in dieser Gegend (...) des Germanicus Caesar (...) wurde entsprechend diesem Senatsbeschluss erbaut (...). Ferner gefiel es (dem Senat), dass in Antiochia ein marmornes Grabmal zur Erinnerung an Germanicus Caesar errichtet werden soll, auf dem Forum, wo der Leichnam des Germanicus Caesar eingeäschert wurde (...), und dass in Epidaphni, wo Germanicus Caesar gestorben ist, ein Tribunal gebaut wird (...). (...) und dass am sechsten Tag vor den Iden des Oktober (10. Oktober) jährlich an dem Altar, der vor dem Tumulus des Germanicus Caesar steht, zur Erinnerung an ihn öffentlich seinen Manen die Totenopfer durch diejenigen in dunkle Togen gekleideten Hauptleute (magistri) der sodales Augustales dargebracht werden sollen, denen an diesem Tag nach menschlichem und göttlichem Recht die Toga dieser Farbe erlaubt ist, (und zwar) nach demselben Opferritus, nach dem den Manen des Caius und Lucius Caesar öffentlich die Totenopfer dargebracht werden.Und der bronzene Cippus bei diesem Tumulus des Germanicus Caesar soll in ähnlicher Weise mit einer Inschrift versehen werden, so dass diese Senatsbeschlüsse, die sich auf seine Ehrungen beziehen, dort eingemeißelt werden. Und an diesem Tage soll es den Amtsträgern, die in einem Municipium oder einer Stadt (colonia) römischer oder latinischer Bürger für die Rechtssprechung zuständig sind, nicht erlaubt sein, irgend eine wichtige Angelegenheit öffentlich zu verhandeln; ferner sollen von nun an (an diesem Tag) keine öffentlichen Mähler, und auch keine Hochzeiten römischer Bürger, oder Verlobungen mehr stattfinden; niemand soll geliehenes Geld von jemandem nehmen, noch einem anderen geben; und Spiele sollen weder veranstaltet noch besucht werden, und auch nicht, was für die Spiele verwendet wird. Die Theaterspiele, die üblicher Weise am vierten Tag vor den Iden des Oktober (12. Oktober) zum Gedenken an den vergöttlichten Augustus stattfanden, sollen auf den fünften Tag vor den Kalenden des November (28. Oktober) verlegt werden; durch die Verlegung um diese beiden Nondinen nach dem Tag, an dem Germanicus Caesar gestorben ist, (soll erreicht werden, dass) der Tag der Theaterspiele nicht durch Trauerriten betrübt wird. (...) dem Tiberius Caesar Augustus, unserem Herrn (princeps) (...) weil der Tag auch (...) und seiner Rede (...) und sein (...) billigen (...) die städtischen Stimmbezirke (tribus urbanae) und (...) versprochen hat. Und daher gefällt es dem Senat, dass die städtische Bevölkerung (plebs urbana) öffentlich Statuen des Germanicus Caesar im Triumphgewand aufstellt, (und zwar) in den Tempeln und auf den öffentlichen Plätzen, auf denen der vergöttlichte Augustus und die Augusta seinem Vater Drusus Germanicus schon vorher [Statuen] errichtet hatten, mit einer Inschrift der plebs urbana und der 35 Stimmbezirke. Ferner soll das Gedicht (carmen), das Tiberius Caesar Augustus am 17. Tag vor den Kalenden des Januar (16. Dezember) zum Lobe des toten Germaicus vor dem Senat gehalten hat, in Bronze graviert, and einem öffentlichen Ort befestigt werden, wo es seinem Vater beliebt.Der Senat glaubt, dass dies mit umso mehr Recht geschieht, als die Gedenkschrift (libellus) des Tiberius Caesar Augustus aufs Engste vertraut (mit dem Verstorbenen ist) und nicht so sehr einen Lobpreis seines Sohnes Germanicus Caesar enthält, als vielmehr eine Beschreibung seines ganzen Lebens, und das wahre Zeugnis seiner Tugend. In ebendieser Gedenkschrift hat er selbst bezeugt, dass er selbst (das vorbildliche Leben des Verstorbenen) der ewigen Erinnerung zu übergeben und nicht zu verbergen wünscht, und er hat die Überzeugung geäußert, dass es der Jugend unserer Kinder und unserer Nachfahren nützlich sei. Weiterhin, damit das rechte Verhalten des Drusus Caesar umso deutlicher werde, gefiel es (dem Senat), dass die Gedenkschrift, die er in der letzten Senatssitzung verlesen hat, in Bronze graviert und an einem Ort angebracht wird, wo es ihm und seinem Vater gut scheint. Gleichfalls soll dieser Senatsbeschluss, zusammen mit dem Senatsbeschluss vom 16. Dezember, in Bronze graviert werden, und diese Bronzetafel soll auf dem Palatin, in der Säulenhalle beim Tempel des Apollon angebracht werden, wo die Senatssitzungen abgehalten werden. Ferner wünscht der Senat und hält es für gut, damit der Respekt aller Stände für das Kaiserhaus möglichst deutlich wird, und die Übereinstimmung aller Bürger, dass die Erinnerung an Germanicus Caesar geehrt werden muss, dass die Consuln diesen Senatsbschluss zusammen mit ihrem eigenen Edikt veröffentlichen; (die Consuln) sollen außerdem befehlen, dass die Amtsträger und Abgesandten der Munizipien und der Coloniae eine Abschrift (hiervon) in die Munizipien und Coloniae Italiens schicken, sowie in die Coloniae in den Provinzen. Die Vorsteher der Provinzen werden richtig und ordnungsgemäß handeln, wenn sie dafür sorgen, dass dieses Dekret an einem möglichst belebten Ort angebracht wird. (Der Senat wünscht und hält es für gut), dass Marcus Messalla und Marcus Aurelius Cotta Maximus, die (für das nächste Jahr) designierten Konsuln, sobald sie ihr Amt antreten und die Auspizien es erlauben, und zwar ohne die (übliche) Verzögerung um zwei oder drei Nundinae, Sorge dafür tragen, dass der Volksversammlung das Gesetz über die Ehrungen des Germanicus Caesar vorgelegt wird. So wurde beschlossen. Anwesend im Senat waren 285 (Senatoren). Dieser Senatsbeschluss wurde in der zweiten Sitzung gefasst, zusammen mit (dem Beschluss vom 16. Dezember?). (...) Dieses Tempels (...) und dass (...) des Germanicus Casesar gemacht werden, die (...) der Tempel des vergöttlichten Augustus (...) die Spiele der Victoria des Kaisers (...) des Tiberius Caesar Augustus (...) im Tempel der Concordia (...) die Reiterstatuen des Germanicus Caesar, die (...) sie sollen vorangetragen werde (...) er soll Sorge tragen (...) wegen dieser Sache öffentlich (...); und dass auf dem Palatin, in der Säulenhalle am Apollontempel, wo der Senat zu tagen pflegt, unter den Bildnissen der Männer von herausragendem Charakter die Bildnisse des Germanicus Caesar und seines Vaters Drusus Germanicus, des leiblichen Bruders des Tiberius Caesar Augustus, der selbst einen vorbildlichen Charakter hatte, aufgestellt werden, (und zwar) auf den Kapitellen der Säulen des Baldachins, der das Kultbild des Apollon schützt. Auch sollen die Salii in ihren Liedern den Namen des Germanicus Caesar zur lobenden Erinnerung einfügen, wie dies auch zu Ehren des Gaius und Lucius Caesar geschehen ist, der Brüder des Tiberius Caesar Augustus; und zu den zehn Wahlzenturien des Gaius und Julius Caesar, die die Vorentscheidung zu treffen pflegen, wer sich als Consul und Prätor zur Wahl stellen soll, soll (...) hinzugefügt werden (...).
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